TTT#371 Social Media in Schools? Paige Woodard, Jo Paraiso and her students: Bassam Taleb, Katia Navidad, Jorge Espinoza 11.6.13

On this episode of TTT we discuss social media in education with several high school students. We are joined by:

Paige is on a mission, and we learn a lot by when Joanna’s students who are working on http://youthvoices.net join her in this conversation.

Here’s what Paige wrote recently on Shane Haggerty’s blog http://publicassemblypr.com/2013/10/31/what-i-learned-one-students-mission/:

Changing the education system is difficult, but tangible.

For the past three months I have focused on integrating social media into the education system and, surprisingly, have found countless administrators, teachers, and social media gurus alike that are passionate about assisting me in my mission.

My social media education mission began with a simple Twitter account and blog on WordPress, yet my ultimate goal is to film a DVD to sell to school administrators that will explain why social media is beneficial in the classroom and how it can be incorporated into the curriculum.

Paige also writes (in an email):

I am really interested in students’ responsibility on social media and why they should monitor what they share, as college admissions and future employers alike research you on social media before accepting you into their college/university or allow you to represent their business.

I am also advocating for social media usage in the classroom because it exposes students to countless opportunities unavailable to them in their school district. As an example, without the use of social media and networking, I would not have made a presentation to Howard Rheingold’s class at Stanford University.

I am happy to brainstorm any other ideas as well.

Want more? Here’s Howard Rheingold’s interview with Paige and and her teacher, Don Wettrick, “Freedom, Autonomy, and Digital Media at an Indiana High School” http://dmlcentral.net/blog/howard-rheingold/freedom-autonomy-and-digital-media-indiana-high-school


Click Read more to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast.


Parents as Partners Episode 47 February 20, 2012 Shannon Smith on Building Personal Learning Networks

I was pleased to have Shannon Smith join me on Parents as Partners at Edtechtalk on Monday February 20, 2012 to talk about Building Learning Networks. Shannon created a mini-tutorial on how to use Twitter as a tool and in the show demonstrated how to use Twitter with an emphasis on connecting learning for principals, teachers and parents. You will find a link to the video in the LiveBinder for the show. (Link below) Shannon has highlighted some key points on how to create your Twitter accounts. Special thanks to Aviva Dunsiger for taking the mic and sharing how she uses Twitter with her students and their parents. The following video, LiveBinder and Chat log are good tools to use in your school or parent community to promote using social media tools with parents and teachers. I am still reflecting on the sharing of ideas by participants in the chat room. The issue of fear and negativity was identified as a barrier to using tools like twitter. Please take a look what the participants suggested as solutions and share your thoughts.

The following is a recording of the show. If you don’t see a video here, please refresh your browser.

LiveBinder of the resources for the show. You can find links used by Shannon or shared by participants in the chat. Chat Log .

Click here for the full BlackBoard Collaborate recording

Shannon showed us this great video by Nancy White and Suzy talking about starting with Twitter.

Shannon’s Twitter Tutorial



If you want some motivation to get your school principal, superintendent or Director to use Twitter send them to this video.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #208 – Wondering about fossil fuel and enjoying the power of twitter in the NWP – 07.07.10

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, Alicia Blair, a science teacher who lives near the beach in Mississippi, asked us to think of her the next time we pump Fowl Language by Paul Jacksongasoline into a gas-guzzling automobile. Later in the show her heart went out to an art teacher, April Estep, who lives 20 minutes from the site of Massey Energy’s Upper Big Branch mining disaster. Casey Daugherty, a co-director of the Ozarks Writing Project, observed, "We’ll think of April every time we switch the lights on."

Sandwiched between these ongoing conversations about how to respond to the BP oil spill and similar disasters such as the Big Branch disaster, we talked about how to raise teacher voice and how to push out audio and video on social networks like Twitter.

This summer our guests brought twitter and social networking to and from their local Invitational Summer Institutes of the National Writing Project. Paul Oh leads us in this discussion of how the face-to-face, intense summer work widens when social networks become part of the mix.

Our guests on this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers were:

Learn more from these folks and others on this recent NWP resource page, Tweeting in the Summer Institute and Beyond:

Writing Project teachers have found Twitter to be a serious learning tool. Many sites across the country integrated Twitter into their summer institutes this summer, and teachers have built "personal learning networks"—groups of people who casually join together to communicate and collaborate on common topics—where they discuss serious educational issues.


Story behind the image:

As an ornithologist’s son, watercolor artist Paul Jackson grew up spending Christmases in the park ranger’s cabin on Horn Island, Miss. Over several weeks, he turned his outrage into “Fowl Language,” in which a least tern, stilt, egret, cormorant and other Gulf birds sit atop a dropping-streaked BP sign as an oil rig smokes in the background.

He posted a photo of the painting on his Web site while the paper was still damp. Within two hours, it was selling as a T-shirt on the art-sale Web site Zazzle.com.

The Columbia, Mo., painter has since created his own site, “Art vs. Oil Spill.” About 100 artists from as far away as India and Malaysia have offered works, with all proceeds going to nonprofit groups working to clean up the oil or oiled animals.

Artists find ways to protest Gulf spill | Associated Press | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

ETT21 #132: Social Media, Construction and 5th and 6th Grade Tech

 

 21st Century Learning #132Facebook

May 25, 2010

Social Media, Construction and 5th and 6th Grade Tech

 

arvind discusses Hewitt School’s venture into Facebook and Twitter.  Vinnie discusses the construction project that his school is diving into.  Alex discusses teaching 5th and 6th grade Tech Classes in the fall.  We wrapped with some conversation about Google and its recent upgrades.   

 

* Photo Credit: Pshab

 

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Teachers Teaching Teachers #182 – A student-centered follow up: More on games, YouTube, Twitter, and Research – 01.13.10

On this week’s Teachers Teaching Teachers, we had some follow-up’s, and some room for new voices. Paul Allison invited several of his students from the East-West School of International Studies in Flushing, NY onto the show to explain more about gaming. These students were listening and in the chat room on TTT#181 the week before when we talked about gaming in schools with other teachers, researchers, and consultants. The student had asked for a student-centered follow up. Listen to find out where gaming is in their lives.

And stay tuned every Wednesday evening this Spring as Paul and Susan Ettenheim and other students learn about bringing gaming into their curriculum this coming semester. If you know of a gamer, please invite him or her to join us as well! We’d love to include other students via Skype!

And if that’s not enough, this week’s podcast also includes George Haines, a 6th grade teacher back on the show to talk about a Twitter project he was about to launch. George was on TTT in August: Teachers Teaching Teachers #165 – 08.26.09 – Meet Lisa Dick and George Haines: Talking about research and diigo George has written us recently to say that he hasn’t given up on “video and self-directed learning via youtube."

I haven’t scrapped that platform yet, but I decided to try to use Twitter for self-directed learning first. It is so much more nimble of a platform, I figured it would allow for a more fluid discussion and more immediate feedback and clarification.I saw that you have a youthvoices account on twitter and I just started following it. My kids are almost ready to start tweeting out their questions and connecting to other kids as part of this “KidSourcing” project. My kids are 6th graders, but I have invited any classes in the ballpark to connect with my kids. We are connecting to kids in Tanzania (http://epicchangeblog.org/2009/10/21/the-twitterkids-of-tanzania/) and I am working out the involvement with schools in Peru, Brazil, China and a couple here in the old U.S. of A. I don’t know how neatly our project meshes with what you are trying to accomplish with Youth Voices, but I figured I would reach out and gauge  your interest in connecting.Here is the basic outline for the project: The idea is to have kids search for answers from the crowd of kids with no help from the adults (aside from monitoring and guiding offline).

The idea is to seek answers to “why” questions as opposed to “What” questions. For example, a question that a kid can simply Google like “when did the civil war start?” is a bad one, but a question like “WHY did the civil war start?” is a good one. Questions that start discussions, lead to independent research and sharing links fit the bill. The idea would be to keep it loose and low impact- not a heavily dependent collaboration. I will probably tell my kids to post a new question each week and I will probably give them an arbitrary number of questions from other kids to help answer.

For the first month we will work in depth on the project, then I hope to make it part of the routine when they come to the lab, meaning they login and check twitter for 5-10 minutes before we launch into whatever other projects we are doing at the time. video and self-directed learning via youtube.I haven’t scrapped that platform yet, but I decided to try to use Twitter for self-directed learning first. It is so much more nimble of a platform, I figured it would allow for a more fluid discussion and more immediate feedback and clarification.I saw that you have a Youth Voices account on twitter and I just started following it. My kids are almost ready to start tweeting out their questions and connecting to other kids as part of this “KidSourcing” project. My kids are 6th graders, but I have invited any classes in the ballpark to connect with my kids. We are connecting to kids in Tanzania (http://epicchangeblog.org/2009/10/21/the-twitterkids-of-tanzania/) and I am working out the involvement with schools in Peru, Brazil, China and a couple here in the old U.S. of A. I don’t know how neatly our project meshes with what you are trying to accomplish with youthvoices, but I figured I would reach out and gauge  your interest in connecting.

Click Read more to see a transcript of a chat that was happening during the webcast.

21st Century Learning #113: Roxbury Latin’s Social Media Plan

21st Century Learning #112
October 20, 2009
Andrew Katz and Ken Hiat on Social Media at Roxbury Latin School

A conversation with Andrew Katz and Ken Hiat about Roxbury Latin‘s Social Media strategy and the way their community is implementing their plan.  

 

Photo Credit

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