Teachers Teaching Teachers #255 Exploring Minecraft w/ Jo Kay, Dean Groom, Bronwyn Stuckey, Joel Levin, and Chad Sansing 7.13.11 No ratings yet.

If you dig Minecraft (or wonder why other teachers–and their students–do) you’ll enjoy this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, recorded earlier this summer. We were joined by a few teachers who have recently launched Massively Minecraft:

The purpose of this community project is to trial the use of the game Minecraft (http://www.minecraft.net) in schools as part of voluntary student activity. The community will engage in exploration and research, not to decide or direct any particular application of the game but, to understand where students might take it and how they and their teachers visualise possibilities for it use within the curriculum. This ethnographic approach relies on you, as the professional in the school, to observe and reflect on student imagination, initiative, interaction, engagement and learning.

The facilitators of this site, Jo Kay, Dean Groom, and Dr Bronwyn Stuckey share their thoughts, questions, and stories about Minecraft on this podcast.

The Minecraft Teacher, Joel Levin and Chad Sansing (who had been with us for an earlier show about Minecraft) joined the conversation as well.

Check out Joel’s videos on YouTube. Also, Ed Tech Crew did a great interview with Joel and Dean as well.

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Teachers Teaching Teachers #259 Getting Ready with Youth Voices 8.10.11 No ratings yet.

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers we are joined by Kevin Hodgson, Charles Freij, Margaret Simon, Judy Jester, Ronnie Burt, Gail Desler, Chris Sloan, Adam Cohen, Dan Polleys. We talk about our plans for the fall and how using Youth Voices might fit with our work with our students.

(Sorry about the over-modulation on some of these voices. We’ll improve sound quality in the future.)
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Teachers Teaching Teachers #258 What would Peter Little think? Inquiries for curriculum on the Horn of Africa 8.3.11 No ratings yet.

This episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers started a couple of weeks ago on Google+. Here’s the story of why we invited anthropologist Peter D. Little to join us in our planning for classes this fall. 

It started when I (Paul Allison) asked a couple of questions after reading about a meeting in Rome, where the international community rallied “to the aid of drought- and famine-affected populations in the Horn of Africa with an immediate, twin-track programme designed to avert an imminent humanitarian catastrophe and build long-term food security in the region” (The Standard, 07/25/2011). I wanted to learn more about what was happening on the Horn of Africa, and so I ventured forth by quoting a couple of paragraphs from this article, and by asking a couple of questions.

These two paragraphs leave me with a lot of questions. The notion of a pastoralist is new. I want to learn more about these livestock owners who travel from place to place. How does that work? And the notion of “agropastoralists” seems to imply that they also do farming, which would mean that they move less often. How do these people work in Somalia and other countries? Are they in one ethnic group? Is the famine affecting these folks? Can they provide long-term solutions?

Soon after I posted this, and some back and forth had begun, we received this note from Kris Jacobson, a high school librarian who is interested in learning, libraries, education, professional wrestling, news and politics:

I’m glad that the proposed solutions include letting agropastoralists & pastoralists maintain their nomadic way of life and their animals. Development specialists should not be in the habit of trying to make people abandon their cultures and economies. If you’re interested in East African pastoralists, Peter D. Little is one of the top researchers in the field:
http://esciencecommons.blogspot.com/2011/07/what-we-can-learn-from-african.html

What a wonderful lead this turned out to be into my ongoing inquiry into the Horn of Africa as we plan curriculum together for this fall. With a hat tip to Kris Jacoboson, I continued to read and to write on Google+ about what I to what I was learning:

Thanks to +Kris Jacobson I’ve just been educated on the pastoralists in the Horn of Africa. Carol Clark writes with knowledge and clarity about the the pastoralists, whose lives, Professor Peter Little has been documenting for some time. As he writes:

During the past 27 years, my research has addressed the anthropology of development and globalization, political economy of agrarian change, pastoralism, environmental politics and change, informal economies and statelessness, and food insecurity in several African countries. Most of my field studies have been conducted in Africa, with a primary emphasis on eastern Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia).


I was off and running, inspired because I had a frame to work with. I followed up by reading a couple of studies and a chapter in a book by Peter Little, and I found that his voice was echoing in my head, with hope in local solutions in Somalia. At least librarian Kris Jacobson and the writer of the Emory University blog, Carol Clark had sent me through Peter Little on a quest to find what local knowledge and indigenous culture and industry and agriculture there might be in Somalia and Ethiopia and Kenya and the rest of the Horn of Africa. How are the people there dealing with the droughts and what’s preventing them from finding their own solutions? I began to ask. 

As my inquiry continued, I found myself wondering, “What would Peter Little say?” His work had provided for me a perspective, perhaps a conscience as I have been reading (and writing) about the complex, ever-developing issues surrounding the famine.

And so, we asked him to come on Teachers Teaching Teachers to guide us toward the questions we might be asking our students, to wonder what approaches he will be taking this fall himself, and to dialogue with him about the famine that we are facing on the Horn of Africa.

Thanks also for our other thoughtful guests, Shannon Sullivan who developed curriculum for PBS, Chris Sloan, Zac Chase, and Adam Cohen.

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Teachers Teaching Teachers #257 Youth Voices with Alice Barr, Matt Montagne, Sandy Scragg, Sheri Edwards, Valerie Burton 7.27.11 No ratings yet.

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, we get together and talk about Youth Voices with Alice Barr, Matt Montagne, Sandy Scragg, Sheri Edwards, Shantanu Saha, Valerie Burton, Chris Sloan, and Paul Allison. 

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #254 – What happens when a brewer becomes a teacher? Meet Tommy Buteau (plus Chad Sansing) 07.06.11 No ratings yet.

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, meet Tommy Buteau and learn more about Chad Sansing and the Cooperative Catalyst. Tommy recently wrote Paul Allison.

Paul,

I read about the Youth Voices project at the Digital Is site, and I think it sounds very interesting, like something I would use with my 9th and 11th grade English classes here in Windsor, CO. So, I visited the site and signed up, but it seems like I do not have access to everything. I can only see three of the guides that you use, and the directions for most of the activities seem limited. I enjoyed the free-writing article by Peter Elbow, and I also like the 10 questions activity. I am wondering if there is a description of how teachers use this site somewhere. 

Thanks, 
Tommy Buteau 

That’s not all, a couple of days later Tommy wrote:

Have you ever used your site for cross-campus peer reviews before? I found that when students from another school did a peer review, the results were great. We used google docs for it. You can see what I did with a creative writing class at https://sites.google.com/site/101wright1/creative-writing-2010-2. Then, we did a similar process with speech podcasts athttp://schoolweb.psdschools.org/frhs/LangArts/SP/Buteau/index.html. I think the key is that it was completely anonymous.

Thanks, 

We couldn’t wait to welcome Tommy into our community and to learn more about his work. We were also delighted to welcome Chad Sansing back to TTT. You can see the results of the challenge we threw to him on TTT #256 – Cooperative Catalyst.

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Teachers Teaching Teachers 253 Chris Lehmann, Bud Hunt, Diana Laufenberg, Zac Chase, Matt VanKouwenberg, Larissa Pahomov 6.29.11 No ratings yet.

There were many wonderful moments at ISTE this year! One of them was the closing keynote by Chris Lehmann, principal of the Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Philadelphia. That evening we invited Chris, Bud Hunt, and four teachers from SLA — Diana Laufenberg, Zac Chase, Matt VanKouwenberg, and  Larissa Pahomov — to join us at Rembrandt’s Restaurant (aka SLA North) to reflect on ISTE and whatever else they wanted to talk about.

Enjoy the SLA students and Chris Lehmann’s speech in this video, check out his reflections, and listen to our conversation. Enjoy!

Chris Lehmann’s ISTE Keynote – Process and Impressions: I gave the closing keynote at ISTE on Wednesday, and it was a really wonderful experience. It’s an amazing thing to get up in front of 5,000 plus people and talk about what you deeply believe. It was particularly hard for two reasons – one, the ISTE community is as close to a “home-base” outside of SLA that I have in the world of education. There are so many people – too numerous to mention here – who have been friends, co-learners, mentors, sounding boards over the past six years that to speak in front of all of them in one place was both exhilarating and a little intimidating… and many of them had heard me speak at other events, so finding something new for that segment of the audience was a real challenge. But the real reason it was so hard to craft this speech was because I was preceded by my students. (Read the rest of this post on Practical Theory –
A View from the Classroom.

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Teachers Teaching Teachers #251 Pre-ISTE (1 of 2) Suzie Boss (Edutopia) & Christina Cantrill (National Writing Project)- 6.15.11 No ratings yet.

Enjoy this podcast, recorded 10 days ago, getting ready for ISTE. What are you looking for there? What are you bringing?

Click Read more to see Christina Cantrill’s personal list of some of the events where National Writing Project (WP) teachers will be participating as well as the chat that was happening during this webcast.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #250 Meenoo Rami on #engchat and and Samantha Adams on mobiles in the NMC K-12 Horizon Report 6.8.11 No ratings yet.

What are your personal learning networks (PLN) online? What do your students do? Do we use different or similar tools to learn online? Do you use mobiles? Do students? What do students’ PLN’s look like now? What will they look like in 1, 3, and 5 years?

Samantha Adams and Meenoo Rami are two of our guests on this episode of Teachers Teaching
Teachers.  Samatha Adams joined us for further conversations about the NMC Horizon Report: 2011 K-12 Edition, and Meenoo Rami let us know what’s happening at #engchat on Twitter on Monday evenings and beyond.

Samantha Adams
Director of Communications, NMC (www.nmc.org)
Samantha Adams came to the NMC with an extensive writing and research background in both print and digital publishing. After working with the top trade publishers in the world for a previous job digitizing content for ebooks, she fell in love with writing about emerging technologies. At the NMC, she works closely with CEO Larry Johnson to spearhead the NMC Horizon Project, which encompasses the The NMC Horizon Report series. In the recently released NMC Horizon Report: 2011 K-12 Edition, she was deeply involved in the research and writing of the report. As the lead writer at the NMC, Samantha also focuses on strategic communications within and outside of the NMC member community, promoting special events and publications, while managing the organization’s social media forums. In her free time, Samantha enjoys writing fiction and has recently published an anthology of short stories.

Meenoo Rami and a couple of her colleagues who helped make #engchat the place to be on Twitter on Mondays at 7:00 PM Eastern / 4:00 PM Pacific.

Click Read more to see a recent sampling of #engchat
and a copy of the chat that was happening during this webcast.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #249 – Writing, Making, Sharing, and Learning about Gardens: National Writing Project Makes! 6.1.11 No ratings yet.

Do you garden with your students? Do they make things? And do they read and write about these experiences, japan_136.jpg.scaled.1000and sometimes publish the results online?

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, you’ll hear National Writing Project teachers from Colorado, Oklahoma, Massachusetts, and California describe the gardens and writing projects they are doing with their students.

One of the guests, Patricia Paugh, recently did a session at the National Writing Project’s Urban Sites Network meeting in Boston.

Adventures in Text Analysis: Reading and Writing a Community Garden Project
Mary Moran and Patricia Paugh,
This session investigates theories related to genre pedagogy enacted in a year-long project on community gardening in an urban neighborhood. The session will include analysis of multi-genre texts and sharing of artifacts related to purposeful writing by students who worked with an urban farming collaborative. (Patricia C. Paugh, is an Associate Professor Department of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Massachusetts Boston.)

We were also joined by an elementary school teacher, Denise Ferrell, who told us about the multiple garden projects she has been doing with Annie Ortiz and other colleagues at the Skyline Elementary in Stillwater, Oklahoma:

We are fortunate at Skyline to have several kinds of gardens. We have a butterfly garden, an 83 ft raised bed, 5 small square raised beds, a cistern, some small dwarf fruit trees. We also have an outdoor classroom.

Fred Mindlin, Associate Director for Technology Integration at the Central California Writing Project, joined us from a Whole Foods store! Fred has been working with gardeners and digital stories and videos, and more as part of the National Writing Project’s Makes project.

Marshall Woody from the Southern Colorado Writing Project who has just starting gardening with his students, was on the call with us as well.

Enjoy!

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

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