TTT#346 Connected Learning is Production Centered – “Forge IV” with Ed Martinez, Fred Mindlin, and Dan Spelce 4.24.13

Another story of +Connected Learning on this episode of TTT.

We are joined by Ed Martinez, +Fred Mindlin, and Dan Spelce to discuss "Forage IV," a pilot program supported in part by NWP's collaboration with the MacArthur Foundation's Digital Literacy Initiative.

Integrating art with environmental education, we support teachers in linking their existing curriculum to a student-led interest-driven project, collaborating with practicing artists.

The Project web site is http://forage.storyreach.com/

We are also joined by Jennifer Woollven, Joel MalleyScott Shelhart and Kelsey Shelhart.

Paul Allison's profile photoFred Mindlin's profile photoScott Shelhart's profile photoJennifer Woollven's profile photoJoel Malley's profile photomonika hardy's profile photo

This is a story for the National Writing Project's Connected Learning Inquiry Group's Session 6 – Connected Learning is Production Centered http://connect.nwp.org/online-learning-connected-learning/p/16923

This story helps us put learning narratives next to this description of connected learning from The Digital Media & Learning Research Hub http://dmlhub.net/ :

Connected learning environments are designed around production, providing tools and opportunities for learners to produce, circulate, curate, and comment on media. Learning that comes from actively creating, making, producing, experimenting, remixing, decoding, and designing, fosters skills and dispositions for lifelong learning and productive contributions to today’s rapidly changing work and political conditions.

This webcast is one in a series that we've been doing recently where we are asking: Where are the classrooms that are doing this well and how do they ensure that the other principles are in place?

Enjoy!

Forage III hanging in a window of the Ritt in Santa Cruz, CA

Forage III hanging in a window of the Ritt in Santa Cruz, CA

TTT#333 Be Lab Update with Cristian Leobardo, Karen Fasimpaur, Gregory Hill, Monika Hardy, and Mikhil Goyal 01.23.13

On this episode of TTT Monika Hardy and her student, Cristian Leobardo lead us in a be lab update. We take a look at their revised Website, their book, and their travels http://redefineschool.com.

Here's how Monika, her students and her colleagues describe their main foucus/premise:

Public education could be the most accelerating venue for social change. Rather than waiting for any of the incredible [past, current and ongoing] innovations in redefining public education to scale, imagine we scale the individual. Imagine a new (old) narrative that can start anywhere because it begs no prep or training. Imagine we trust simplicity enough to give it a go. Imagine hastening equity, and ongoing sustainability.
I’ve been working with youth the last four years, locally in Loveland Colorado, as well as virtually around the globe. We have been in an intense mode of experimenting with first, self-directed learning, and now, the intersection of city and school. We've been afforded an incubated space (sand box) within our city, as a connected adjacency (both in and out of) our school district.

We are joined on this episode of TTT by

Paul Allison's profile photoScott Shelhart's profile photoCristian Buendia's profile photoKaren Fasimpaur's profile photoGregory Hill's profile photomonika hardy's profile photoNikhil Goyal's profile photo

Paul Allison, Scott and Kelsey Shelhart, Cristian Leobardo, Karen Fasimpaur, Gregory Hill, Monika Hardy, Mikhil Goyal

Enjoy!

TTT#331 Re-mix, OER, and Educon 2.5 w/ Bill Fitzgerald, George Mayo, Harry Costner, Scott Shelhart, and Kelsey Shelhart 1.09.13

On this episode of TTT, re-mix and get ready for EduCon 2.5 http://educonphilly.org with George Mayo, Harry Costner, and Bill Fitzgerald along with our friends Scott Shelhart and Kelsey Shelhart.

Paul Allison's profile photoHarry Costner's profile photoBill Fitzgerald's profile photoScott Shelhart's profile photomonika hardy's profile photoGeorge Mayo's profile photo

A few weeks ago, George wrote in an email:

Another teacher and I have this experiment for this year's Educon called @remixeducon http://educonphilly.org/conversations/remixeducon . We're planning on creating a structure for participants to share, download and remix media created throughout the conference. The other teacher's name is Harry Costner. He's a really cool middle school film teacher in Virginia.

Would it be possible for us to pitch our @remixeducon idea on a TTT show sometime after the new year as we get closer to Educon? I'm trying to think of ways to spread the word about our project before the conference.

How do you turn down an offer like that?

In addition, Harry and George are doing a second session at Educon on Video Production and Social Media http://educonphilly.org/conversations/Video_Production_and_Social_Media:A_Powerful_Combination

That's not all!

When we heard that Bill Fitzgerald would be remixing at Educon too, we asked him what he’s up too. Here was his reply:

We are definitely running a pre-Educon event – the details (and some of our thoughts about what we hope to achieve, big picture) are linked in this post: http://funnymonkey.com/when-we-talk-about-open-content-this-is-what-we-talk-about

Our Educon session on this is at http://educonphilly.org/conversations/Adopting-Using-and_Reusing_Open_Content

We are also doing a second session on starting a non-profit: http://educonphilly.org/conversations/So_You_Want_To_Start_an_Educational_Non-Profit

Sounds like fun doesn’t it? Enjoy!

TTT#327 Two Teachers Listening to Two Students for One Day on Earth with Kelsey Shelhart and Erika Auger 12.12.12

On this episode of TTT, two students, Erika Auger (9th Grader from Wiscasset, Maine) and Kelsey Shelhart (8th Grader from Wheatfield, Indiana) join Paul Allison (NYC) and Monika Hardy (Loveland, Colorado) to tell stories that answer a couple of questions posed by our friends at One Day on Earth: What do you have? What do you need?

On the TTT episode before this one TTT#326, we met founder Kyle Ruddick and Co-Author of One Day on Earth Educational Materials, Daniel Lichtblau: TTT#326 Think Global, Act Local with Youth http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZR4ZwWfkCU&feature=youtu.be&t=4m04s .

This episode of TTT is our contribution to One Day on Earth 12.12.12: two teachers learning by listening to two students, all thousands of miles away from each other. Enjoy!


Click Read more to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast.


 

TTT#326 Think Global, Act Local – Introducing Kelsey Shelhart to the Alliance for Climate Change and One Day on Earth 12.5.12

On this episode of TTT, we do our best to help Eighth-grader Kelsey make connections with people like Leah Qusba from the Alliance for Climate Education: and Kyle Ruddick, the founder of One Day On Earth. Enjoy the conversation, and consider ways of collaborating with us on some our plans together.

Paul Allison's profile photoScott Shelhart's profile photoMonisha Nelson's profile photoKyle Ruddick's profile photoChris Sloan's profile photoLeah Qusba's profile photomonika hardy's profile photoCristian Buendia's profile photo

Paul Allison, Scott and Kelsey Shelhart, Monisha Nelson, Daniel Lichblau and Kyle Ruddick, Leah Qusba, Monika Hardy, and Cristian Buendia

On the previous episode of TTT#325 – Youth Night with Monisha Nelson, Kelsey Shelhart, Cristian Buendia, Jessica Morgan, Tommy Buteau, Jeff Lebow 11.28.12, we asked a few youths what changes they wanted to make happen. Kelsey said that she wanted to start an environmental club in her school. On this episode we do our best to help her! Our guests this week offer ways to help Kelsey — and all of us with something to DO around climate change and taking a global perspective.

Here are some notes added by our guests during the live webcast:


Click Read more to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast.


TTT#325 – Youth Night with Monisha Nelson, Kelsey Shelhart, Cristian Buendia, Jessica Morgan, Tommy Buteau, Jeff Lebow 11.28.12

How can we get out of their way even more? http://youtu.be/LsMew9Bamhg

Recently on TTT we've been inviting students to join us. Our recent interest in putting young people at the center of our conversations was re-sparked on this episode of Youth Night on TTT.

Our guests are:

Monisha Nelson's profile photoMonisha Nelson Jeff Lebow's profile photo Jeff Lebow Kelsey Shelhart's profile photo Kelsey Shelhart
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cristian Buendia's profile photo Cristian Buendia Katie Ward's profile photo Jackie Morgan Tommy Buteau's profile photo Tommy Buteau

Perhaps you know a student, a son or daughter, brother or sister who might want to join our efforts on TTT to turn our show over to youths to plan impromptu and scheduled webcasts via Hangouts On Air that will allow them to deepen their conversations with each other and to amplify their voices.

Enjoy this week's open, chaotic, ground-level planning session, and invite a student to join us soon in this ongoing set of conversations.

 

Links for taking action:


Click Read more to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast.


TTT#315 Digital Storyteller/Maker/String Arts Master/3rd Spacer, Fred Mindlin & Sculptor, Ed Martinez w/ Kelsey Shelhart 9.19.12

On this episode of TTT teachersteachingteachers.org/feed/podcast, find out what Digital Storyteller/Maker/String Arts Master/3rd Spacer, Fred Mindlin is up to with Metal Sculptor, Ed Martinez at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History.

 

 

Last week, Ed Martinez started a 5-week series of workshops with students to create another in a group of mobiles he’s been working on representing the forage species of the local marine environment in Santa Cruz, California. Fred MIndlin is facilitating student sharing of reflection and analysis about the process and its meaning. Read more about this project at http://forage.storyreach.com/, and see more about Ed’s work at http://junkartscramble.com/

This is a relaxed, reflective, and insightful conversation, thanks in large part to the comments and questions from 8th-grader, Kelsey Shelhart.

Please join our dialogue by adding your comments on this Vialogue:

 

 

TTT#302 Creating a National Collective Voice of Young People with Charlie Kouns, David Loitz and amazing young voices! 6.13.12

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers we talk with Charles Kouns and David Loitz and a wonderful panel of students about the listening sessions Charlie and David create for teens to raise their voices on school change. The student voices you hear on this podcast are Sierra Goldstein, Jay Smith Chisley, Mackenzie Amara, Nikhil Goyal, Kelsey Shelhart

Sierra Goldstein's profile photoDavid Loitz's profile photoCharles Kouns's profile photoJay Smith Chisley's profile photoMackenzie Amara's profile photoNikhil Goyal's profile photoTrevor Shelhart's profile photo

We invite you to be reminded of the importance of starting with youth voices when we consider what to do next as educators.

https://www.facebook.com/imagininglearning
(Quickest way to get in touch with David and Charlie)

Our conversation on this podcast is about how important it is to listen to students, and we learn more about David and Charlie's methods of doing that. David Loitz writes:

Charlie's focus is in helping to bring the voices and visions of youth people to a national stage. He is both a teacher and an visionary. He is a dear friend and mentor. He created Imagining Leaning four years ago, and has traveled up and down the west coast and as far as New Zealand to host listening session with groups of young people.

http://www.imagininglearning.us/
(Many amazing images here, and a place to donate.)

David Loitz [ http://about.me/dloitz ], a passionate lover of education, film, basketball, food and life. He is currently working towards his Masters in Holistic Elementary Education at Goddard College. He writes and organizes at Adventures In Learning [ http://adventuresinlearning.tumblr.com ] and on the Cooperative Catalyst [ http://coopcatalyst.wordpress.com/author/dloitz ], @dloitz.

Charles Kouns [ http://www.imagininglearning.us/#%21our-stewards], @Penthias, the Founding Steward of Imagining Learning, an educator and the father of three. Imagining Learning [ http://www.imagininglearning.us ] is creating a national portrait of young people’s wisdom on the reinvention of education. Learn more about Charlie's vision on the Cooperative Catalyst.

Enjoy!

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

TTT #296 String Art with Fred Mindlin – 05.09.12

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, +Fred Mindlin/@fmindlin starts with string art, and pulls us into his world of anthropology, story-telling, collaborative learning, and more!

Fred inspires and entertains all of us in this episode of TTT: +Lacy Manship/@now_awake, +Gail Desler/@GailDesler, +Kelsey Shelhart, +Denise Colby/@Niecsa, +Paul Allison/@paulallison, +Chad Sansing/@chadsansing, and +Diana Maliszewski/@mzmollytl.

minecraft3

To get the full effect, take a moment to find some string before you listen to this episode of TTT. How much? Fred says, "About two meters or a little over 6 feet is usually a good length. Hold the string between your two hands stretched out as wide as they go, then add about 6 inches."

Fred explains that he was "inspired by the session we had with teachers using Minecraft, where we explored an online game world via another virtual world, https://edtechtalk.net/node/5102 and I was intrigued by whether it would be feasible to explore a meatspace game in our virtual Teachers Teaching Teachers forum." He sees "string games as a gateway to keyboarding and creativity or finger calisthenics, and computer keyboarding: media magic for tradigital storytelling."

Playing games with string is a human cultural universal. This ancient art form is surprisingly helpful in developing both the manual dexterity and strength needed for computer keyboarding. The approach I use for teaching string games to groups also provides a helpful practice ground for some of life's essential skills: creativity, resilience, cooperation, and storytelling.

And that's not all. Here's an excerpt and a couple of photos from a post that Diana wrote shortly after this episode of TTT:

There were some great quotes that Chad, a fellow participant, shared via Twitter. (I can't recall them all – they were things like "it's important to model failure" and "string games are 'digital' fun".) What I realized was how potent teaching string games would be to analyze your own teaching practice. Listening to Fred teach the group how to make a 3-pronged spear made me hyper-aware of how important detailed, clear instructions are, and the different learning styles at play. The first time I tried it, I failed. The second time, when Fred re-explained and added a few "notice this part here" tips, I did it! I cheered pretty loudly when I succeeded. My webcam wasn't working on Google +, so I convinced my daughter to take a photo of my accomplishment.
 

I made a 3-pronged spear! Here's proof!
A less complimentary shot of me, with my string jedi master Fred on-screen

Fred mentioned that there are several books and YouTube videos that explain, step by step, how to make different shapes. I think I need a person near me to give feedback (though the string collapsing in unrecognizable shapes is pretty immediate feedback too). I gave myself a goal – to teach the kids in my SK and Grade 7 classes how to make the 3-pronged spear and do it to music at a June assembly. I'm repeating it here so it'll be my contract to myself to try it out and report what results.

Enjoy!

TTT#285 Who drops out? with Nick Perez, Todd Finley, Alex Pappas, Troy Hicks, Lisa Nielsen, Teresa Bunner, Lisa Nielsen 2.22.12

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers +Paul Allison +Monika Hardy, and +Chris Sloan welcome many different perspectives on the important question of Who drops out? Why? Does it matter? What alternatives are available?

teachers285

With a wonderful mix of thoughtful people we explore how questions about “engagement”—even what it means—help us have productive dialogues about what good teaching and learning looks like and what might change in our schools. Each of us in this conversation are working to reconsider our assumptions and to recast our questions about student engagement in high school and beyond. Please add to this mix by listening in and adding to the comments below.

Nick found our conversation and had this poignant, detailed response, which I can’t figure out how to excerpt, so here it is in full. Nick wrote to us:

I don’t think high-school is for everyone – just like college isn’t for everyone. This might not be a popular opinion, but I’d love to see more of a focus on alternative forms of education for dropouts, and less of a focus on forcing them to stay in schools where they don’t feel productive. A little background on how I formed that opinion:

I’m a high-school dropout. I wrote my first program when I was ~10 years old, and spent my time coding instead of doing schoolwork. Everyone knew that I was educating myself, but I was still treated like a troublemaker because of my grades. After being placed in a horrible, kind of humiliating special-ed program in middle school (I had someone following me around all day, making sure I was paying attention), I started skipping school because I felt alienated. I’ve never been allowed in a regular high-school classroom (I was in a small program for troubled kids, where it wasn’t unusual for a student to be out for weeks/months due to jail-time), which made me feel further alienated, and motivated me to skip class more often.

So eventually I left. I think there should be more of a focus on our unique needs, and more of an understanding of the fact that “unique needs” doesn’t necessarily equate to learning disabilities or behavioral problems – some of us prefer to work without a standardized curriculum, some of us prefer to work alone, some prefer to work in groups, some want complete guidance, and some just want independent study with extra help on-call.. and yeah, some are stubborn enough to reject any form of education that doesn’t meet their needs/desires/expectations, like myself.

I don’t regret a thing. I love self-educating, because I love freedom and self-accountability. If I fail to learn the things I need to learn, it’s an issue that I deal with on my own, instead of facing disciplinary action, or getting an “F”, or being placed in a box of “bad kids”. I have a job. I pay taxes. I’ve never had issues paying my rent. I’m still self-educating at every opportunity and always will be. Life goes on. I’d love to help other dropouts feel like they haven’t missed their chance.


Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

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