TTT#353 Teachers Speaking Up-2 w/ Andrea Zellner, Katherine Schulten, Steve Zemelman, Jen Ochoa, Beth Sanders, Pat Delaney 6.19

A provocative conversation about Teachers Speaking Up w/ @AndreaZellner, @KSchulten, @StevenZemelman, @Ochoajen @MsSandersTHS, and Pat Delaney on this episode of TTT (Please subscribe with this link: http://www.teachersteachingteachers.org/feed/podcast/ (And BTW http://cloud.feedly.com is a great replacement for Google Reader. The App, BeyondPod now integrates with Feedly.)

On this episode of TTT, we are joined by:

Andrea Zellner's profile photoKatherine Schulten's profile photoSteven Zemelman's profile photoPatrick Delaney's profile photoJennifer Ochoa's profile photoBeth Sanders's profile photo

This episode is a follow up to TTT#351 Teachers Speaking Up w/ Jesse Hagopian, Diana Laufenberg, José Vilson, Steven Zemelman, Pat Delaney, Maribeth Whitehouse https://edtechtalk.net/node/5198 — and we plan more on this topic later this summer.

Here are a few notes from the show:

Look at what happened in Michigan today, Andrea Zellner writes: Our teachers are passionate and outspoken: http://www.michiganradio.org/post/teachers-rally-lansing-more-support-public-education

Jen Ochoa’s “Give Them an Apple, or a Hug: Help Teachers and Students Survive Testing” http://www.wnyc.org/blogs/schoolbook/2013/apr/16/give-them-an-apple-or-a-hug-help-teachers-and-students-survive-testing/

Kevin Hodgson’s blog: http://dogtrax.edublogs.org/

Be sure to follow up at Teachers Speak Up http://teachersspeakup.com , a blog, where Steve Zemelman is a co-convener.

Some of the interesting things going on in Philly for Teacher Voice –
http://facesofthelayoffs.org/about-the-project/
http://thenotebook.org/
http://www.educationvoterspa.org/index.php/site/take-action/
http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/school_files/ (Kristin’s live-tweeting of the SRC meetings is legendary and an amazing resource for the community)
http://www.tagphilly.org/

Brave New Voices –
http://youthspeaks.org/bravenewvoices/
Fundraising link: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/team-atlanta-goes-to-brave-new-voices-2013

Lisa Neilsen’s group on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/homeschoolingunschooling/
A place where parents, students, teens, and teachers frustrated with traditional schooling can come together to discuss the more effective options they are pursuing. Conversations often address things like opting out of testing and other traditional schooling issues.


Click Read more to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast.


TTT#309 Badges:Peril/Possibility P. Rawsthorne, A. Zellner, V. Gennarelli, E. Eidman-Aadahl, S. Grant, S. Lee, D. Cormier 8.8.12

Our goal in this–and the next–episode of TTT teachersteachingteachers.org/feed/podcast is to join those who are developing a practical, pedagogical discourse between the heckling and the hype around badges. Our conversations are open and wide-ranging, but we have a few questions that must be answered soon, as the fall semester starts up around the US:

  • Does it make sense to wrap Youth Voices youthvoices.net with badges?
  • How would it work?
  • What impacts might there be on different kinds students?
  • How do I start?

Of course, it's impossible to pull apart the different philosophical, political, and psychological threads that seem to attach themselves to badges, but the educators in this conversation begin to bring some clarity to the questions involved.

In this episode,

host

Peter Rawsthorne's profile photoAndrea Zellner's profile photoVanessa Gennarelli's profile photoElyse Eidman-Aadahl's profile photoSheryl Grant's profile photoSunny Lee's profile photodave cormier's profile photo

There's only so much that this many thoughtful participants can say in an hour, but we hope that there are a few moments while you are listening when you find yourself wanting to enter the conversation. Let us know what you are thinking by posting a comment below. And join us next week as we continue our conversations about badges on TTT with these thoughtful educators:

We'll continue these conversations live at edtechtalk.com/ttt on Wednesday, 15 August at 4PM ET / 1PM PT/ World Times: goo.gl/tERfa. NOTICE THE EARLIER TIME.

We’ll continue to focus on incorporating badges into K-12 education and beyond. There’s so much to say on the topic.

What’s your favorite blog post, video, article, resource about Badges? Please add a couple of links in the comments below. We want to be open and flexile about all of the ways people are talking about the issues involved. And, we are interested in keeping it real. We’ve been developing some ideas around badges for Youth Voices youthvoices.net, and there's more about this on P2PU goo.gl/oKQ1R.

See you on Wednesday.

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

TTT#300 with Elyse Eidman-Aadahl, Jeff Lebow, Chad Sansing, Andrea Zellner, Fred Haas, Paul Oh, Robin Sowder, Teb Locke 05.30.12

THANK YOU for all of the support and good wishes upon TTT#300.

Elyse Eidman-Aadahl's profile photoJeff Lebow's profile photoChris Sloan's profile photoChad Sansing's profile photoAndrea Zellner's profile photoFred Haas's profile photoPaul Oh's profile photoRobin Sowder's profile photomonika hardy's profile photoTeb Locke's profile photoScott Shelhart's profile photo
 
Here's Paul Oh's description of our work: Teachers Teaching Teachers Achieves 300th Broadcast Milestone
 
 
 
 
One-minute teaser (entire video below):
 
We started our celebration with a look at a couple of the philosophical touchstones for TTT, mainly World Bridges and the National Writing Project. Jeff Lebow (WB) and Elyse Eidman-Aadahl (NWP) helped us with these starting points. 
 
Here is Paul skyping in to EdTechTalk#40 (pre-Webcast Academy Launch) asking "Why do it live?   https://edtechtalk.net/files/ETT40-why-live.mp3
 
Here's more about World Bridges from Curt Bonk in 2007 http://travelinedman.blogspot.com/2007_07_01_archive.html:
 
More on Worldbridges:
The goals of Worldbridges are relatively simple and straightforward, as follows, “Our primary goal is to foster understanding and cooperation amongst the citizens of the world. We value civility and respect, open source collaboration, fair distribution of income, and a sense of world identity.” As part of these efforts, Worldbridges seeks to foster positive systemic changes in areas such as education, the environment, and politics. It also supports reliable and fair commerce. And it promotes a “people’s forum” for more civilized discussion of problems, issues, and conflicts that pose significant challenges in united the people of this planet. Values supported by the Worldbridges organization include respect and civility, fair distribution of income, world identity, and open source collaboration.
 
Jeff Lebow began experimenting with Worldbridges ideas (initially called “World Explorer”) when starting his master’s program in Training and Learning Technologies at the University of New Mexico in 1993 after a year of teaching English in Thailand (Worldbridges, 2007). At that time, Lebow became excited at the possibilities of the convergence of intercultural interaction and collaborative and interactive online technologies. After completing his masters, he returned to Asia—this time Pusan, Korea—where he taught English as a university and began to experiment with online audio and video, which included covering the Nagano Olympics in 1998. After burning out on all his activities and attempting to envision and build a webcasting network his life took a turn, or as he puts it, “I decided to quit my job, shave my head, and go to India for a while to contemplate the next chapter, for me personally and for Worldbridges. After some quality offline time, I decided to give Worldbridges a shot.” In Lebow’s vision for Worldbridges, he sought for it to become a means for using Internet technology for a global webcasting network of people. And it has!
_________________________________
 
And here's a paragraph about the National Writing Project's core philosophy by Art Peterson in 2004
 
The National Writing Project's core philosophy, "teachers teaching teachers," is perhaps most directly expressed in the invitational summer institute's teacher demonstrations. NWP founder Jim Gray writes in Teachers at the Center, his memoir of the writing project beginnings, "The most successful demonstrations communicate not only what the teacher does but also why the teacher thinks this particular practice works. The emphasis upon the why as well as the what is important: it provides a theoretical underpinning and it accents a considered approach to writing beyond mere gimmickry" (143). According to Gray, this demonstration serves as a "trial run" for the workshops future teacher-consultants will present during inservice work in the schools, but it is intended to be much more than a simple demonstration of a strategy or technique. It is intended to be a significant "genre" for the circulation of knowledge about practice.
__________________________________
 
Enjoy!

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TTT #292 Net Smart w/ Alice Barr, Nancy Sharoff, Vinnie Vrotny, Valerie Burton, Sarah Rolle, Scott Lockman, Andrea Zellner 4.11

This is the first of three shows (#292 April 11, #294 April 25, #295 May 2) in which we are talking about Howard Rheingold’s new book, Net Smart, How to Thrive Online. Howard joins us on Wednesday, May 2.

Joining Paul Allison, Monika Hardy, and Chris Sloan on this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers are Alice Barr, Nancy Sharoff, Vinnie Vrotny, Valerie Burton, Sarah Rolle, Scott Lockman, and Andrea Zellner.

Paul Allison's profile photoAlice Barr's profile photoChris Sloan's profile photoNancy Sharoff's profile photoVinnie Vrotny's profile photoValerie Burton's profile photoSarah Rolle's profile photomonika hardy's profile photoscott lockman's profile photoAndrea Zellner's profile photo

On this episode we mainly talk about the introduction to Howard’s book and a syllabus for a social media literacies course on the high school level that he has compiled from his college-level syllabus.

Syllabus: Social Media Literacies, High School Level, Seed Version Compiled By Howard Rheingold

Howard writes:

As an instructor of undergraduate and graduate students at University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University, I created a syllabus for the benefit of other college/university level instructors. I created a copy of the original syllabus for modification to use with high school students (probably juniors or seniors). I will rely on actual high school teachers to help me modify this source document. Please feel free to use, modify, and share this syllabus in your own way. Reorder the modules, add or subtract required or recommended texts and learning activities. Use your own assessment methods. If you wish to help improve this seed document, contact [email protected] and I will add you as a commenter and/or editor.

This syllabus is based on my 2012 book, Net Smart: How to Thrive Online, as a textbook. I set out to write the book as an educational instrument. As I explain in the introductory chapter, (which is downloadable free of charge), I have concluded, after thirty years as an online participant, observer, and teacher, that social media literacies are a critical uncertainty in the issue of whether digital media improve or erode human individual capacities and collective culture. Just as in the eras following the invention of the alphabet and printing press, literate populations become the driving force that shape new media. What we know now matters in shaping the ways people will use and misuse social media for decades to come.

The 21st century depends on a critical mass of people who understand basic scientific literacy, media literacy, information literacy, in addition to the literacies I cover in my book and in this syllabus. I use “literacy” in the sense of a skill that includes not only the individual ability to decode and encode in a medium, but also the social ability to use the medium effectively in concert with others. I didn’t write the book as a syllabus, but as a logical ordering of the five social media literacies of attention, crap detection, participation, collaboration, and network awareness: attention is the starting place for all media use; crap detection is necessary for effective participation; knowledge of individual participation is by its nature enmeshed with collaborative communications that take place through networked publics. When composing the syllabus, I duplicated much of this progression, but chose texts that can offer analytic tools, explanatory frameworks, and competing perspectives — the basic building blocks for teachers to use. For high school communities, “Critical consumption online” or “critical consumption of social media” could substitute for “crap detection” as a label. The methods are identical, although many resources most appropriate for high school students must exist to replace texts in the original, college-level version.


Here are a couple of moments from Teachers Teaching Teachers #294
where we think about Crap Detection in light of KONY 2012. The entire show is there as well.

Please join our conversation with Howard Rheingold on Teachers Teaching Teachers this Wednesday, May 2 at 9:00 PM Eastern / 6:00 PM Pacific / World Times.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #281 – National Writing Project Teachers Ready to Celebrate Digital Learning Day on Feb 1 – 1.25.12

This conversation about #NWP teachers in the National Digital Learning Day continued the next day at NWP Radio – on Blog Talk Radio: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/nwp_radio/2012/01/27/digital-writing-matters

What are your plans for National Digital Learning Day #DLDay on February 1, 2012? http://digitalis.nwp.org/site-blog/what-are-your-plans-national-digital-lea/3369

Enjoy this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, recorded a week before the big day.

+Paul Oh helped us invite this amazing list of guests. They are listed below, along with one thing we’ve asked them in our conversation about Digital Learning Day.

+Natalie Bernasconi, Central California Writing Project and middle school teacher; presenting the Digital ID wiki http://digital-id.wikispaces.com/Welcome as part of California Digital Learning Day presentations in Sacramento on Feb. 1

+Gail Desler, Area 3 Writing Project and Instructional Technologist in Elk Grove, California; also presenting the Digital ID wiki as part of Digital Learning Day presentations in Sacramento

+Andrea Zellner, Red Cedar Writing Project, doc student at Michigan State University, who is working with Michigan State’s MA in Ed Tech program to “try something new” and document; artifacts from and about the experiences will be found here: http://dlday2012.tumblr.com/

+Leigh Wolf, Program Director for the MA in Ed Tech Program, is coordinating efforts with Andrea; here’s a link to a post at Leigh’s bloghttp://www.leighgraveswolf.com about Digital Learning Day.

+Tom Fox, Northern California Writing Project & National Writing Project, English Professor at Chico State University, will be presenting digital compositions created by his students at the Digital Learning Day presentations in Sacramento

+Jack Zangerle, Hudson Valley Writing Project, 8th Grade ELA teacher in Dover, NY, doing things for Digital Learning Day in his classroom

+Matt Dunleavy, former Tech Liaison of the Tidewater Writing Project in Virginia, and a professor at Radford University, currently working with Chris Dede from Harvard on an Augmented Reality project called EcoMobile, which will be presented in D.C. on Feb. 1 as part of Digital Learning Day activities there.

More on Digital Learning Day: http://www.digitallearningday.org

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #272 – City as Floor Plan with Ron Link, Andrea Zellner, Mary Ann Reilly, and David Wees – 11.16.11

teachers272

In a busy week with conferences and conventions–physical and and online–going on all over, it was good to stop and think about what we want schools to look like. On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, Paul Allison introduces his Assistant Principal, colleague and friend Ron Link to Monika Hardy and Mary Ann Reilly. Ron is cooking up ideas for a new school, and many of his thoughts have seemed parallel to some of what Monika and Mary Ann have been talking about at labconnections.blogspot.com. Andrea Zellner and David Wees are always a delight to hear from! Enjoy this conversation, and let’s keep talking about what we want schools to look like. Joining this episode are: monika hardy,  Ron Link,  Andrea Zellner,  Mary Ann Reilly,  David Wees, and Paul Allison


Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #241 – Why we love the National Writing Project and why Federal funding is important – 3.30.11

Several leaders in the National Writing Project–Paul Oh, Elyse Eidman-Aadahl, and Troy Hicks–joined us from Washington DC where
they were working to lobby members of Congress today, Thursday, March 31.

Also Chad Sansing, Zac Chase, and Andrea Zellner joined us on the Skype conversation–as well as many friends in the chat. Chad has been organizing a
blogging effort going on around the country.  Here’s what he is asking
supporters of the NWP to do:

Please add your voice to the chorus of educators from around the country who are blogging in support of the NWP.
We’re trying to accumulate 1,000 blog posts by April 8, when the next
Continuing Resolution for the federal budget expires. There are already
nearly 150 posts – moving stories of the impact of the NWP on the lives
of teachers and students – at the archive: http://coopcatalyst.wordpress.com/2011/03/15/the-blog4nwp-archive/ You can tweet or email your blog post URL to Chad Sansing (twitter: @chadsansing; email: [email protected])
who has been organizing this effort, or post it to this discussion and
we’ll make sure it gets added to the archive. Remember to try to tag
your posts with: #blog4nwp. FYI, we’ve gotten a few responses on
twitter to this effort from the press office of the Department of
Education (see: http://www.andrea-zellner.com/archives/629 and http://aetweets.wordpress.com/2011/03/25/blog4nwp-and-being-bossy/), so let’s keep it up!
Check out what folks have written to get an idea of what you might add
but more importantly take a few minutes to add your story (stories).

Listen to find out what we can do to help restore funding to the National Writing
Project. Then find your own ways to add your voice the the the chorus singing praises to the
National Writing Project!

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #229 – How do we become more effective online educators–for students and other teachers? 12.15.10

If you wanted to talk about online education, who better would you like to sit down with than these four educators:

pe-davecormierDave Cormier

Photo_on_2011-12-28_at_13.48__2_reasonably_smallAndrea Zellner

main-thumb-434715-100-sN3LK0iSEklBVhLiOZyNYZ8t4Yu60KG8Fred Haas

Zac Chase
zac_chase

That’s what Susan Ettenheim and Paul Allison had the privilege of doing on this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers. Enjoy!

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #212 – A community of teachers building “Voices on the Gulf” – 08.04.10

As you will hear on this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, we are very excited about the new website, http://voicesonthegulf.org ! On this podcast we are joined by:

We are putting together a team to help us to develop this site — and fast. We’ve set up the following Community Managers:

David Pulling (Louisiana) – Site Manager
Paul Allison (New York) – Site Manager

Catherine Tibbs (Mississippi) – Art and Humanities
Ellen Steigman (Louisiana) – Art and Humanities
Susan Ettenheim (New York) – Art and Humanities

Paige Baggett (Alabama) – Community and Culture
Suzie Boss (Oregon) – Community and Culture

Jeff Mason (Florida) – Health and Wellness
Andrea Zellner (Michigan) – Health and Wellness

Natasha Whitton (Louisiana) – Money and Careers
Chris Sloan (Utah) – Money and Careers

Alicia Blair (Mississippi) – Nature and the Environment
Matt Montagne (California) – Nature and the Environment

Kyle Meador (Louisiana) – Social Issues and Human Rights
Diana Laufenberg (Pennsylvania) – Social Issues and Human Rights

Stacey Ferguson (Mississippi) – Our Space (K-6)
Margaret Simon (Louisiana) – Our Space (K-6)
Gail Desler (California) –  Our Space (K-6)
Kevin Hodgson (Massachusetts) – Our Space (K-6)

Along with this growing group of National Writing Project teachers, teachers from along the Gulf Coast, teachers in Edutopia’s pblcmp, AND/OR teachers involved with the EdTechTalk/WorldBridges community, we have been organizing (and working with Bill Fitzgerald at FunnyMonkey) to build this site that will do the following:

  1. Provide a place where we can collect, amplify, and engage the poems, stories, and essays that students along the Gulf Coast bring to their teachers this month, as schools open.
  2. Layer these stories, poems, and essays with online sources, including news releases and poetry (such as the poems on Poets for Living Waters).
  3. We don’t know yet! Many of us have been working for some time on building a site like Voices on the Gulf, and we have some idea what directions this will take, AND we want to allow the discussions on the site to help us know how to develop.

The most important item, above is #1 – we are working as fast and hard as possible to get the site out to teachers, and for it to be easy to use. If you would like to add a poem, thought, or anything, please sign up, then once you’ve been made into a member, you’ll see the Add Discussion button. Please go in and write a brief reflection, add  photo, a video, or almost anything — just to see how easy it is to do. AGAIN, THANKS!

Students have been coming back the past couple of weeks in many Gulf Coast schools. A lot of our connections with teachers on the Gulf have happened this summer on a live webcast that we do every Wednesday evening. You may have already been on the show. We would love it if you would come back. We’ve been able to make a lot of invaluable connections. You can see what we mean here: https://edtechtalk.net/teachersteachingteachers

We would love to invite you to join us on Teachers Teaching Teachers every Wednesday at 6:00 p.m. Pacific / 8:00 p.m. Central / 9:00 p.m. Eastern. If you use Skype, please email Paul Allison or Susan Ettenheim and let us know your Skype name (again)— just helps us to know who to look for! We hope that you will be able to join us soon on a Wednesday evening.

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #207 “We’ve been taken over once again by something that we couldn’t stop, can’t stop.” – 06.30.10

This the fourth week of a summer series in which we have focused Teachers Teaching Teachers on the BP Gulf Oil Spill. Our guests included:

  • Matt Montagne, who has been collecting materials, such as: October 28th, 2010 TEDxOILSPILL Talks. The Google Doc that Matt can be found at http://tinyurl.com/voicesonthegulf – And stay tuned! There much more to come under the domain: "VoicesOnTheGulf." (We also eventually agreed on the common tags: "voicesonthegulf" and "edoilspill"
  • Diana Laufenberg, a history teacher from Science Leadership Academy who joined us on this topic 3 weeks ago will try (from her family’s farm) to join us again.
  • Natasha Whitton, one of the three teachers from the Southeastern Louisiana Writing Project two weeks ago, hopes to join us again
  • Andrea Zellner, a biology and English teachers from the Red Cedar Writing Project in Michigan will be with us again!
  • AND NEW to our webcast: Catherine Tibbs, a former high school English teacher who works for the Live Oak Writing Project in Mississippi joined us. (She is also invited colleagues who will be heard on future podcasts. Catherine wrote this on a Monday late in June :

     I don’t know if you know this or not, but oil reached the MS beaches this weekend. We had been fortunate so far to avoid this mess. From what I understand from the media, the manpower was not coordinated in the Gulf to skim the oil that is now reaching us. Isn’t that always the case?

  • Also new to the podcast is Jeff Mason from Penscola, Florida, a biology and technology teacher. We met a Twitter, and we look forward to a continuing connection. (Jeff came on the webcast last week as well, so look for more from him on future podcasts.)

We hope you will be able to join us in this ongoing project. Help us know how to respond as teachers—and with our students—to this monster that will continue to reek havoc for weeks? months? to come!

Join us to talk about what’s happening in the gulf every Wednesday at http://EdTechTalk.com/live at 9:00pm Eastern / 6:00pm Pacific USA (World Times). 

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

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